Wild Wing Cafe Offers $5000 for Winning Wing Recipe

Bar patrons like to grouse about the rising price of chicken wings, but Wild Wing Café is willing to pay $5000 for the perfect wing.

The chain restaurant is again staging its Battle of the Bones competition, in which customers compete to concoct the best new wing recipe. Wild Wing is now accepting recipes online; eight of the recipes will be selected for the contest bracket. Starting Dec. 16, the wings will be served in select restaurants (including the Charleston, North Charleston and Mt. Pleasant locations.) Customers can cast their votes in person or online.

The last wing to survive elimination will earn a permanent spot on the Wild Wing menu, and its inventor will receive $5000 and a private party hosted by the Zac Brown Band’s executive chef. Continue reading

Xiao Bao Celebrates Beaujolais Noveau With French Bistro Menu

Modern Vietnamese cuisine was deeply influenced by French colonization, and Xiao Bao Biscuit this weekend is making the connection explicit with a French bistro-style dinner.

The restaurant on Saturday will celebrate the release of Beaujolais Noveau by giving its kitchen staff a chance to flaunt their fine dining backgrounds; although the a la carte menu hasn’t yet been released , owner Joey Ryan says it will consist of traditional French dishes.

“Music to match,” he promises.

Fish Eliminates Lunch Service

One of the first restaurants to brave upper King Street is adjusting its schedule to reflect the changing character of the neighborhood.

With so many diners now flocking to the area, Fish is doing away with the lunch program it devised to draw customers who might be skittish about venturing north of Calhoun Street at night. According to Christie Gregovich of operator Patrick Properties Hospitality Group, lunch wasn’t part of the 13-year old restaurant’s original business plan.

“The thought was really to give folks a reason to come to this side of town,” Gregovich says of the popular $10 lunch deal. “Now with the development of the neighborhood and growth in foot traffic, we can really be truer to our business model and respond to what we see as a stronger call to offer dinner service on Sundays.” Continue reading

Katsu Japanese Steakhouse Adds Korean Dishes to Menu

 

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Katsu is still a Japanese steakhouse, but the North Charleston restaurant is rounding out its menu with a few Korean dishes in response to customer demand.

According to general manager Charles Rutherford, patrons of the 13-year old restaurant kept asking owner Ho Dong Lee to serve dishes from his homeland.

“I’d tell them about Mama Kim’s, but they said ‘there’s nothing up here’,” Rutherford says.

So starting Nov. 23, the menu will include bibimbop, bulgogi and Korean barbecue, prepared on the standard hibachi grilling table. “They get to see the show,” promises Rutherford, who’s also training kitchen staffers to make to-go orders. Continue reading

Burwell’s Celebrates Birthday With a Steak Boast

Another local restaurant is turning one, and it’s celebrating by crunching numbers.

According to a release from Burwell’s, the downtown restaurant overcooked just 12 steaks out of every 30,000 it served over the past year. “That’s a solid standard,” the release says. (Presumably, that number reflects the judgment of the kitchen, not its customers: If only a dozen out of every 30,000 customers complain, Burwell’s has assembled the friendliest group of eaters ever to grace a dining room.)

As for the temperatures the kitchen was trying to achieve, “80 percent (of steaks) were ordered either medium or medium rare,” the release reports.

No word on whether any steaks were sent back for undercooking.

Sweet CeCe’s to Open Cold-Pressed Juice “Retail-Lab”

Darryl Cobb Sweet CeCe'sSweet CeCe’s, which got its start as a frozen yogurt shop, is swerving into science with its latest menu addition.

At the store’s planned juicing station, which a press release describes as “a cross between a traditional juice bar and a clinical cleanse,” customers will have the option of completing a survey developed by a natural health specialist who’s partnered with “a select group of researchers” to determine the health effects of drinking cold-pressed juice.

Neda Smith of Natural Neda says “participation is 100 percent voluntary and confidential,” so customers who don’t want to share whether their spinach, cucumber and celery beverage made them feel tired, hungry or mentally sharp are off the hook. Continue reading

High Wire Launch Party Benefits Greenway Supporters

Drinking and driving may not mix, but High Wire Distilling Co. has come up with a lovely way to make cocktails compatible with biking and walking: The Charleston distillery next week is hosting a spirits launch party to benefit Friends of the Lowcountry Lowline, a greenway advocacy group.

The event at Warehouse runs from 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. next Wednesday, Nov. 20. Attendees will be treated to cocktails featuring High Wire’s gin, vodka and silver rum in return for a suggested $5 donation.

Nephew of Taiwanese Bubble Tea Maker Brings Boba to Charleston

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Tapioca fans may be impatiently awaiting the opening of Terry Hung’s downtown bubble tea shop, but Hung’s relatives are even more anxious for Tapio to start serving soon.

“Our whole family, they’re pretty superstitious, and they’d like to make sure we open before the New Year,” Hung says.

Hung wouldn’t reveal the exact date which his relatives have selected as the most auspicious day for Tapio to open its doors, but says “we’re pushing as fast as we can.”

Although Hung and his brother were raised in Atlantic City, N.J., Hung’s extended family is still in Taiwan, where his aunt runs a bubble, or boba, tea shop. Bubble tea — a late-1980s Taiwanese invention which may have evolved from a teahouse staffer spontaneously pouring rice pudding into her iced tea — is a highly competitive business in Taiwan, but Hung says his aunt’s edge is correctly-cooked tapioca balls. Continue reading

High Cotton Pours Free Bubbly

The spate of human birthdays in November makes scientific sense: Count back nine months, and you’ll land on Valentine’s Day.

But what explains the prevalence of local restaurant November birthdays? Is it a reflection of owners frantically trying to open their doors before the holiday season? Or a desperate effort to qualify for the year’s best new restaurant accolades? Whatever the reason, eaters are the beneficiaries: High Cotton turns 14 tomorrow, and the restaurant’s celebrating by pouring free sparkling wine. Each dinner guest will receive a complimentary glass of Dibon Cava Brut.

High Cotton opens at 5:30 p.m.

82 Queen Offers Taste of Steven Lusby’s Beard House Menu

To experience the whole of Steven Lusby’s James Beard House menu, Charlestonians will have to buy a $170 ticket and travel to New York on Dec. 4. But 82 Queen this month is offering eaters a cheaper chance to at least sample a few of the dishes its executive chef plans to serve.

Throughout November, 82 Queen is offering select items from Lusby’s “Charleston Charm” menu as nightly specials. Among the items slated to be featured are she crab soup, boiled peanut hummus, pickled shrimp and sorghum-glazed pork osso bucco (Check airfares if you’re set on trying the crispy head cheese with black-eyed peas.) The arrangement will no doubt give Lusby a final opportunity to perfect his dishes before serving them in the dining room that’s hosted many of the nation’s finest chefs, including 51 from the Charleston area.

“To be included in a category with the greatest chefs in the world is humbling and exciting,” Lusby is quoted as saying in a release.