Rolf & Daughters Plots One-Night Takeover of Butcher & Bee

Edsel Little

Edsel Little

Rolf and Daughters, the Nashville restaurant which last year earned the number three slot on Bon Appetit’s “best new restaurants in America” list, is planning to occupy Butcher & Bee on June 19 to serve a five-course supper.

According to the event announcement, “The Rolf and Daughters team will be serving a selection of hit dishes from their menu, including their dynamite handmade pasta.”

Butcher & Bee’s Nadya Freire says additional menu details are still being developed, but “we’d like to take advantage of seasonality as much as possible. We definitely want to source some great local ingredients for the menu, both on the produce and protein side.” She mentions Abundant Seafood and Grassroots Wine as possible partners. Continue reading

Roadside Seafood Settles Into Permanent Digs on Folly Road

crabsoupWhen a food truck strikes an item from its menu board, patrons are apt to write off the inconvenience as just another entertaining idiosyncrasy of eating far from a fixed kitchen. As Sean Mendes has learned since he earlier this month opened a permanent location of Roadside Seafood, it doesn’t work that way in restaurants.

“People don’t expect you to run out of everything,” he says. “I’ve been doing three or four batches of she-crab soup.”

The she-crab clamor is understandable, since Roadside – which got its start two years ago as a food truck – produces one of the city’s best bowls.  Based on Mendes’ grandmother’s recipe, the soup bears little resemblance to the flavorless, overworked bowls of thick cream which have caused plenty of Charleston eaters to dismiss the dish as tourist pap. It’s almost more of a chowder than a bisque, crammed with picked crab and flecked with onion and celery. Continue reading

Five Loaves Cafe Plans to Open Summerville Location This Fall

logoAnother Charleston restaurant is opening a Summerville location, with Five Loaves Café today announcing plans to take over the former Farringdon Bistropub.

The news comes just days before Toast of Summerville, a spin-off of the popular peninsular breakfast spot, is scheduled to open on Trolley Road.

Five Loaves owner Casey Glowacki is projecting an October opening for his restaurant, which will offer the same menu as the downtown and Mt. Pleasant locations. Like the Mt. Pleasant location, the Summerville location will feature a full bar and Sunday brunch. Continue reading

Tsukemen-Slurping Time at XBB

tsukemenCelebrity chefs’ reverence for ramen – the subject of the first-ever issue of Lucky Peach, David Chang’s uber-hip food quarterly, and a recurring theme on Anthony Bourdain’s shows – has helped a nation of eaters understand there’s much more to the genre than the noodle packages they bought for a dime apiece as college students. But now that ramen’s common, it’s tsukemen’s turn.

Like ramen, tsukemen is composed of noodles, pork, egg and vegetal accoutrements. But if ramen is a symphony, tsukemen is a concerto, with each component taking a solo turn. Instead of mixing the elements together in a bowl of hot broth, a tsukemen chef serves the noodles, naked and cool, alongside a concentrated dipping broth. Tsukemen – pronounced SKEH-men, almost like lemon – is ideal for warm days. Continue reading

FED Now Serving “American Eclectic” in Mt. Pleasant

chop

FED

Nick Arbuckle, the 30-year old owner of the newly-opened FED in Mt. Pleasant, has moved away from the Charleston area just once. And now that he’s back, he’s vowing not to leave again.

After spending eight years at Langdon’s, Arbuckle helped open Latitude 32 outside of Atlanta. The short-lived restaurant featured global food from the 32nd parallel (don’t bother consulting an atlas: it stretches from Georgia to Sichuan to Iran), which may help explain why Arbuckle chose a more basic concept for his first independent venture.

“American eclectic is the best way to describe it,” he says. “It’s not fine dining, but a step above average.” Continue reading

Halls Chophouse Plans to Open The Other Halls This Summer

hallsOne of the perpetual complaints about downtown Charleston dining is the dearth of upscale lunch options: The problem’s particularly pronounced on Upper King Street, where burgers reign at midday. But a forthcoming lunchroom from Halls Chophouse may mitigate the problem.

According to an application filed with the Board of Architectural Review, the steakhouse wants to transform the former La Fourchette space at 432 King Street into “The Other Halls.” Although general manager Tommy Hall was reluctant to release any details, he revealed that plans include fine dining lunch service: The menu is still being developed. Continue reading

FIG to “Start Paying Extra Attention to Pastry”

figintAlthough online reviewers have described FIG’s desserts as “fabulous”, “delicious”, “excellent” and “amazing” (because, really, what else can you say about the restaurant’s famed sticky sorghum cake?), chef Mike Lata says the restaurant’s taking a “new direction” with its sweets course.

FIG is now looking to hire its first dedicated pastry chef. The position is being advertised in markets including New York City.

“We want to start paying extra attention to pastry,” Lata says. “Although we currently are inspired to create desserts and are proud of our program, (chef de cuisine) Jason Stanhope and I feel like the program deserves the attention of a pastry chef with focus, pedigree and passion.” Continue reading

SNOB Sous Chef Replaces Joe Palma at High Cotton

shawnkellyA Slightly North of Broad sous chef is taking over the High Cotton kitchen.

Shawn Kelly replaces Joe Palma, who – according to a press release – “after fulfilling his two-year commitment to High Cotton, is exploring entrepreneurial opportunities in the Charleston region.”

Kelly, an Ohio native, graduated from Johnson & Wales in Charleston. He’s spent 11 years working under Maverick Southern Kitchens’ executive chef Frank Lee. Continue reading

The Macintosh Introduces Tuesday Roast Series

The Macintosh, which earlier this year partnered with the American Lamb Board for a month long celebration of the struggling industry’s products, is making sheep meat the centerpiece of its first patio roast.

Starting Apr. 15, the Upper King restaurant will monthly host a family-style “Tuesday Roast” supper with beverage pairings. According to a press release, future editions of the event may be headed up by guest chefs.

This month, though, chef de cuisine Jacob Huder is roasting a whole lamb, which will be accompanied by a crudo, grilled venison and spring vegetables. Freehouse Brewery is providing the beer.

Dinner’s priced at $65 a person, and service starts at 6:30 p.m. For reservations, call 789-4299.

Sweet & Savory Swings Open Its Door

sweetsaveThe wait for peanut- butter-and-jelly French toast is over: Sweet & Savory Café opened this week on Spring Street.

As previously reported here, the bakery and all-day breakfast joint is a collaboration between Jessica Wilkie, late of The Kiawah Island Golf Resort‘s pastry department, and her fiancé, chef Logan Scott. Scott’s apparently responsible for the bacon waffle sandwich and fried shrimp po-boy. The complete menu is here.

Sweet & Savory, 100A Spring St., is open daily from 7 a.m.- 3 p.m. Lunch service starts at 11 a.m. For more information, call 727-2549.