Belong to a Losing Barbecue Team? Goose Creek Needs You

The city of Goose Creek has secured a musical act (the Shem Creek Boogie Band) and cornhole boards for its Beach and BBQ Festival later this month, but it still needs competitors for its Boston butt cook-off.

Teams are being invited to submit entry applications for the Apr. 26 event; it costs $40 to play, and the winner takes home $250. Only amateurs are allowed to compete, which means teams that have won or placed in an event sanctioned by the South Carolina Barbecue Association since April 25, 2013 aren’t eligible.

Entry forms must be filed by Apr. 14. To learn more, call 569-4242.

Fatback Collective’s “Rodney in Exile” Tour Kicks Off in Charleston

rodneycookIn order to get cooking back at his home pit in Hemingway, latter-day barbecue hero Rodney Scott is planning to cook in half a dozen Southern cities, starting with Charleston.

Scott’s pit house burned two days before Thanksgiving, and while he’s kept up his normal holiday production schedule with the help of mobile smoking units and temporary pits, he’s planning to properly rebuild the structure.

According to a release announcing the two-week tour, Scott will receive a portion of the funds he needs “to build a new pit room and plan for the future” from the sale of $5 whole hog sandwiches and sides provided by fellow members of the Fatback Collective, a group of entrepreneurs and scholars who champion heritage ingredients and cooking techniques. Continue reading

Home Team BBQ Hosts Beef, Goat and Oyster Party Next Weekend

Garden & Gun’s Jubilee festivities next weekend don’t include a Friday dinner option, but nearby Fiery Ron’s Home Team BBQ is hoping to lure event-goers with a collaborative smoking session.

Pitmasters from Southern Soul Barbeque on St. Simons Island are joining the Home Team crew to prepare beef barbacoa, goat tacos, goat sausage and oysters, along with a sides spread including Brussels sprouts, cornbread, lima beans and corn.

Spokeswoman Angel Postell describes the two sets of pitmasters, who first met when they partenered on the 2012 Charleston Wine + Food Festival finale, as representing “the ‘new school’ of younger pitmasters offering a fresh, creative approach to all things barbecue.” Home Team’s Aaron Siegel recently won a StarChefs.com “concept” award, which recognizes a “creative, successful chef-driven concept that could be successfully expanded.”

The Backyard BBQ, which includes music from Shrimp City Slim and cocktails from High Wire Distilling Co., runs from 7 p.m.-9 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 6. Tickets are $30, and can be purchased by e-mailing info@hometeambbq.com or by calling 345-9563.

Military Vets Raise Money to Compete at Kingsford Invitational

The 2014 Kingsford Invitational had most of its Veterans Day bona fides in order: The barbecue competition was scheduled to unfold aboard the USS Intrepid on Veterans Day weekend. But, according to Summerville pitmaster Russ Cornette, event organizers still needed a team of military veterans to compete.

Fortunately for the Kingsford Charcoal Company, Cornette and his crew were game.

“All three members of Queology are military vets and we will be representing The Folds of Honor Foundation,” Cornette writes. “We are going as the underdog team, I guess you could say.” Continue reading

Author Brings His Barbecue — Er, Barbeque — Book to Charleston

863.4-sc-bbq_home-team-001Lake High is coming to town this Saturday to promote his new book, A History of South Carolina Barbeque. That’s “barbeque” with a “q”, a stylistic decision that’s likely to inflame partisans of a tradition that prizes debate as much as deliciousness.

Barbecue – as the AP Style Guide prefers it – is commonly abbreviated as BBQ, Bar-B-Q and just plain ‘Q’. As Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor, Daniel Vaughn, last year wrote in a blog post for the Southern Foodways Alliance, such shorthand is so popular with pitmasters that “I once asked Aaron Franklin if he spelled out the name of his Austin brisket temple, Franklin Barbecue, on purpose. He confirmed that it was intentional—‘BBQ just sounds like you’re in a hurry’.”

But putting a ‘q’ in ‘barbeque’ is slightly more controversial. That’s because the word barbecue is universally acknowledged as having derived from the Spanish word barbacoa. The spelling ‘barbeque’ recalls a debunked folk theory that the word came from the French barbe a queue or head-to-tail. Continue reading

Kosher Barbecue is Back, Baby.

inuyaki

Inuyaki

This year’s High Holiday season was accompanied by a wave of stories suggesting celebrants smoke their Rosh Hashanah briskets, Texas-style. But for local Jews who adhere to religious dietary restrictions, the chance to go whole beef – or at least whole chicken – with their barbecue interests comes next month, when Synagogue Emanu-El hosts its third annual kosher barbecue competition.

According to organizer Debbie Rothschild, all cooking supplies are provided by the synagogue to prevent a team from wheeling in a rig which previously held a pig. “But we can accommodate everyone,” she stresses. “Last year we had 12 cookers donated.”  The synagogue also orders the ribs, briskets, fish and chickens directly from a kosher purveyor. Continue reading

Restaurant Has A Lot to Celebrate

 

The Lot

The Lot

The Lot‘s turning one next Monday, and the James Island blackboard-menu restaurant is celebrating with whole hog barbecue.

From 6 p.m.-9 p.m. on Sept. 9, The Lot’s serving up smoked pork plates with two sides and dessert for $15. Standard dinner service will be suspended so folks can focus on the birthday festivities, which include music by Weigh Station Duo and drink specials. A ticket’s also good for $2 off Black Joe Lewis’ show at The Pour House later that evening.

In order to handle the hog, The Lot purchased a new smoker, but staffers aren’t yet sure what to call the contraption. The restaurant’s now offering a free ticket to the birthday barbecue in exchange for the best name posted on its Facebook page: Current nominees include Sir Smokes A Lot, Rusty, Boss Hog and The Lot Ness Monster. If you can do better, post your suggestion here.

Tickets to the party can be purchased in advance at The Lot.

Home Team Takes on Texas

htbrisketHome Team BBQ this weekend unveiled the fruits of owner Aaron Siegel and executive chef Taylor Garrigan’s recent study trip to Austin, Tex: Brisket, beautifully fatty, smoky and tender — if a cut below what the pair likely encountered in Hill Country.

The brisket I sampled at The Alley on Saturday night was the unfortunate victim of inexpert slicing, a problem all-too-common even in the Lone Star state, as my friend Daniel Vaughn’s recent Texas Monthly blog post attests.  As Vaughn, the magazine’s barbecue editor, points out, there are several ways to slice a brisket, but none of them involve slicing with the grain. A brisket sliced with the grain acquires an unappealing, stringy pull, and is tougher than brisket sliced against the grain.

“That’s one of the things we’re dealing with,” Siegel says of the extensive staff training required to produce a perfect brisket plate. “We’re schooling everyone on how to serve it.” Continue reading