RiverDogs Introduce Palmetto Beer Brewed Just for Their Ballpark

There are plenty of beers associated with ballparks: Just ask the Cardinals fans who congregate at Busch Stadium. But the RiverDogs have lately upped the ante by introducing a beer brewed specifically for Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Park – and currently available exclusively at the venue.

“The Original,” which debuted last week, is a Palmetto Brewing Company creation. A release describes the beer as “an adventurous blonde with a clean crisp tangerine aroma and a neat finish, along with a slight hint of lemongrass.”

To find The Original, head for the Palmetto Brewery Beer Garden and look for the “special baseball bat handle tap.” The team’s out of town this week, but returns next Tuesday for a home stand against the Augusta GreenJackets.

The Macintosh Introduces Tuesday Roast Series

The Macintosh, which earlier this year partnered with the American Lamb Board for a month long celebration of the struggling industry’s products, is making sheep meat the centerpiece of its first patio roast.

Starting Apr. 15, the Upper King restaurant will monthly host a family-style “Tuesday Roast” supper with beverage pairings. According to a press release, future editions of the event may be headed up by guest chefs.

This month, though, chef de cuisine Jacob Huder is roasting a whole lamb, which will be accompanied by a crudo, grilled venison and spring vegetables. Freehouse Brewery is providing the beer.

Dinner’s priced at $65 a person, and service starts at 6:30 p.m. For reservations, call 789-4299.

School’s in Session at Edmund’s

oast1If school means chalkboards, desks and books, the new quarterly beer program at Edmund’s Oast doesn’t entirely qualify. But everyone who attended the first installment of the Monday night course left with a few tidbits likely to liven up their next non-sanctioned drinking session.

The “Beer School” series consists of four 90-minute meetings, each devoted to a theme. Future meetings will cover beer and cheese; old-world IPAs and new-world IPAs, but leader Brandon Plyler last week tackled Trappist beers.

“It is not a type of beer,” Plyler, a certified cicerone and The Charleston Beer Exchange manager, clarified at the start. “It’s not even a mark of quality.” Continue reading

Southern Beer, Made for Mealtime

fullsteam_SLW1Attendees at this past weekend’s Brewvival, widely considered one of the region’s top beer festivals, were granted sampling glasses at the event gates. Yet forks and knives might have been more suitable for some of the ales being poured: Brewing’s vanguard is especially interested in highly complex, multi-layered flavors right now.

Sean Wilson of Durham’s three-year old Fullsteam Brewery takes a different approach: “My personal comfort zone is how the right beer can enhance a meal, or how it can facilitate community and conversation. Outlandish beers tend to try to turn a beer into an experience — I know because we make a few of them.”

Wilson acknowledges nuance isn’t always the most direct path to recognition and customer acclaim. But he believes food-friendliness could become a defining attribute of Southern beer. Continue reading

New Mt. Pleasant Store Supplies Home Beer and Wine Makers

zolakoma

zolakoma

Many of the yeasts, hops and malts that Peter Kinslow sells at Yeast: Everything Homebrew are also offered by online retailers. But Kinslow says that kind of availability doesn’t much matter when a kitchen project goes awry on a weekend afternoon.

“The big thing for homebrewers is the whoops on a Saturday, when yeast doesn’t get going the way it should,” says Kinslow, who this week opened his Mt. Pleasant store. “Even Monday, if something horrible went wrong, it’s ‘I’ve got to get over to the shop today.’”

Kinslow is keeping hours suited for serving hobbyists, staying open on Sundays and closing on Wednesdays.

Although Kinslow took up homebrewing years ago in Denver, he’s never before run a supply store: He came up with the idea after being laid off from his job. “I thought it was time I did something for myself,” says Kinslow, who spent 27 years in the IT industry. Continue reading

Southend Brewery Hosts Beer Dinner

Oysters, pork, beef and duck are on the menu for an upcoming five-course beer dinner at Southend Brewery & Smokehouse.

The Jan. 29 meal, jointly sponsored by the restaurant and Charleston Culinary Tours, features house-brewed beers including a milk stout, IPA and pale ale (and cheese for dessert, so the evening isn’t completely carnivorous.) The event starts at 7 p.m., and tickets are priced at $60. Call 853-4677 for reservations, or book here.

Middleton Place and Holy City Team Up for Beer Dinner

SONY DSCPerhaps cognizant of potential guests’ worries about imbibing five courses worth of beer pairings before driving home from Middleton Place Restaurant, the venue is making sure its upcoming Braise & Brew dinner ends on a non-alcoholic note.

For dessert, attendees at the Jan. 26 event will be served caramel-apple doughnuts and glasses of Holy City’s Christmasly Spiced Scratch Root Beer.

Holy City’s head brewer, Chris Brown, collaborated with Middleton Place executive chef Brandon Buck to plan the menu for the fourth annual edition of the beer dinner. Other courses include a winter squash soup paired with a German winter lager; a ham hock ragout paired with a bacon-infused porter and brisket paired with stout. Continue reading

Charleston Beer Works Adds Late-Night Menu

wingsCharleston Beer Works is resolving to keep its kitchen open later in the new year.

The King Street bar’s extended food service schedule is set to begin on Thursday. The late-night menu will be available through 1 a.m.

General manager Matt Hensley describes the menu as an extension of the “fresh bar food” concept introduced with a menu rebranding two years ago.

“The only frozen item on our menu are the Tots – and quite frankly, you just can’t mess with a good manufactured tot!,” he writes. Continue reading

Edmunds Oast Introduces Lord Proprietors Ale at Jubilee

beerFolks who paid $85 to attend Garden & Gun’s Jubilee today, tomorrow or Sunday bought the chance to enjoy a sunny day at Charles Towne Landing; mingle with the editors of the swanky magazine; and meet many of the craftsmen who’ve been profiled in its pages. Mostly, though, their tickets allowed them to shop, much the way an airline trip comes with a SkyMall catalog.

Just in time for Christmas, Garden & Gun has assembled the world’s classiest flea market of handmade Southern goods, including a section devoted entirely to food and drink. Hot sauces from Baltimore; mustards from Asheville and chocolates from Charleston – among dozens of other edibles — are tagged for sale. The beer samples, though, are free.

Edmund’s Oast is pouring four brews, including an English-style mild ale, made with British yeast, British hops, British malt and Charleston Tea Plantation black tea. Continue reading

South Carolina’s Year of Rice Beer

lamoix

lamoix

According to my story about the Southeast’s brewing sake scene, which ran in today’s print edition, rice spirits never made much of a splash in the lowcountry. That’s technically true, but food historian and sake connoisseur David Shields points out that rice beer had a very big year in 1893.

As Shields explains, three years before Ben Tillman told voters he’d skewer President Grover Cleveland in the rump with a pitchfork, he persuaded Prohibitionists to support legislation making South Carolina a control state. But the governor’s bill defined alcoholic beverages as drinks with an alcohol content of at least 2.5 percent, which meant the state couldn’t stop the private sale of near-beer.

“The Palmetto Brewing Company of Charleston, a self styled ‘soft drink’ company that had begun manufacturing a rice brew acceptable in prohibitionist southern locales in 1888, began manufacturing oceans of “Rice Beer”—a light beer with an alcohol content under the legal ceiling,” Shields writes. Continue reading