Author Brings His Barbecue — Er, Barbeque — Book to Charleston

863.4-sc-bbq_home-team-001Lake High is coming to town this Saturday to promote his new book, A History of South Carolina Barbeque. That’s “barbeque” with a “q”, a stylistic decision that’s likely to inflame partisans of a tradition that prizes debate as much as deliciousness.

Barbecue – as the AP Style Guide prefers it – is commonly abbreviated as BBQ, Bar-B-Q and just plain ‘Q’. As Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor, Daniel Vaughn, last year wrote in a blog post for the Southern Foodways Alliance, such shorthand is so popular with pitmasters that “I once asked Aaron Franklin if he spelled out the name of his Austin brisket temple, Franklin Barbecue, on purpose. He confirmed that it was intentional—‘BBQ just sounds like you’re in a hurry’.”

But putting a ‘q’ in ‘barbeque’ is slightly more controversial. That’s because the word barbecue is universally acknowledged as having derived from the Spanish word barbacoa. The spelling ‘barbeque’ recalls a debunked folk theory that the word came from the French barbe a queue or head-to-tail. Continue reading

The Green Door to Close on Oct. 31

gdoorThe minds behind Charleston’s most reliably inventive restaurant will now have to think creatively about location, since Big John’s Tavern is booting out The Green Door at month’s end.

The Roti Rolls spinoff late last year took up residence in the downtown dive bar, which was then run by brothers Chris and Jim Condon. But unbeknownst to Green Door owner Cory Burke, the building belonged to their uncle, Ryan, co-owner of The Crab Shack, a local seafood chain. When Ryan Condon took over Big John’s operations, doing away with braised pig heads and kimchi grilled cheese sandwiches was high on his priority list, Burke says.

“He apparently never liked Green Door,” Burke says. “He doesn’t like our food. He hates everything we’ve done.”

Ryan Condon did not immediately return a call seeking comment. Continue reading