Sustainable Seafood Dinner at Edmund’s Oast

Edmund’s Oast is serving butter-poached crab and shrimp; slow-baked grouper and soft shell crab for its first-ever Sustainable Seafood Dinner.

Other responsibly-harvested ocean creatures on the menu for the May 19 event, organized by the South Carolina Aquarium, include flounder and clams.

Dinner starts at 6 p.m., and tickets are priced at $95 (or $135 with beverage pairings.) Ten percent of the proceeds will benefit the South Carolina Aquarium Sustainable Seafood Initiative.

For reservations, call 727-1145.

Edmund’s Oast is Growing

bower

Edmund’s Oast has gone big from the start, with high-aiming beer, cocktail and food programs, but the 6,000-square foot restaurant is about to get bigger still.

Expansion plans call for the addition of an outdoor bar; covered dining and restrooms along Morrison Drive. “The Bower” is intended to supplement the existing al fresco dining area; Currently, patrons seated in the exposed courtyard are limited to ordering snacks.

According to publicist Angel Postell, the expansion will also create more room for private events.

“The Bower” is scheduled for completion this fall.

Dickensian Punch Debuts at Edmund’s Oast This Weekend

ingratiating_manAfter I raved about Edmund’s Oast, Eater Charleston smirked that I was “perhaps the only restaurant reviewer to ever use the word ‘Dickensian’ in a food evaluation.”

Perhaps. But I’m not even the only one in town to use the word in a culinary context. Edmund’s Oast (who else?) is scheduled to put a cocktail called “Dickensian Punch” on tap today.

While I wish I could take credit for inspiring the drink, the nomenclature has nothing to do with me: According to beverage manager Cameron Read, the name was chosen long before my review was published. And the original recipe is older still: “(It) was actually written down by Charles Dickens and sent to a friend of his in a letter,” Read writes.

Dickens’ recipe — reprinted in David Wondrich’s authoritative Punch: the Delights (and Dangers) of the Flowing Bowl, which describes the British author as a “dedicated punch-maker” — calls for lemons, rum, sugar, brandy and fire. Edmund’s Oast plans to prepare the punch in a similar fashion, making it genuinely Dickensian. Sounds like the perfect thing to quaff while reading The Pickwick Papers.

Cocktail Class at Edmund’s Oast

If a houseguest asks for a brown liquor cocktail, odds are he or she will be satisfied with a whiskey sour, Manhattan or Old Fashioned – assuming it’s well-made.

For hosts and hostesses looking to brush up on their mixing skills, Edmund’s Oast next week is offering a “Cocktail Tasting and Educational Class,” at which participants will learn how to make the three classic whiskey drinks.

The Apr. 22 class costs $35, and starts at 6 p.m. Reservations are available through Edmund’s Oast’s website.

School’s in Session at Edmund’s

oast1If school means chalkboards, desks and books, the new quarterly beer program at Edmund’s Oast doesn’t entirely qualify. But everyone who attended the first installment of the Monday night course left with a few tidbits likely to liven up their next non-sanctioned drinking session.

The “Beer School” series consists of four 90-minute meetings, each devoted to a theme. Future meetings will cover beer and cheese; old-world IPAs and new-world IPAs, but leader Brandon Plyler last week tackled Trappist beers.

“It is not a type of beer,” Plyler, a certified cicerone and The Charleston Beer Exchange manager, clarified at the start. “It’s not even a mark of quality.” Continue reading

High Wire and Edmund’s Oast on Imbibe’s Annual “Best Of” List

JF14_Cover310x400Charlestonians should have an easy time keeping an eye on at least two of the entities named to Imbibe Magazine’s second annual list of people, places and flavors to watch in 2014: The owners of High Wire Distilling Co. and Edmund’s Oast are among the 75 selections.

The beverage magazine this month released its best-of round-up, showcasing “who looks to have an interesting vision moving into the year ahead.” Beyond Charleston, Imbibe singled out Portland’s Mark Hellweg in the coffee category; Greg Engert of Washington D.C. in the beer division and Houston’s Alba Huerta and Bobby Huegel for their bartending prowess. Continue reading