Size is Small and Flavor’s Big at Annual Fruit and Veg Show

appletsThe Produce Marketing Association‘s annual Fresh Summit — held this year in New Orleans, one of just seven U.S. cities capable of hosting the massive trade show — is a big deal in the agricultural world because it unites growers, shippers, distributors, retailers and nearly every other industry positioned to profit from the sale of apples, green peppers and pears. But for regular eaters, the event’s fascinating because it offers a glimpse of trends about to overtake the produce departments of their local grocery stores.

Having pounded the floor of the New Orleans Convention Center this past Saturday, I’d advise bracing for the following six healthy food fads:

1. Little is big

If the fruits and vegetables displayed at the show are any indication, plenty of strategy meetings over the past few years ended with produce growers demanding their research teams find ways to make their output smaller. Sunkist touted “kid-sized citrus”, Windset Farms pushed cocktail-sized cucumbers and fingerling potatoes were everywhere. Apparently preying on the average consumer’s fruit ignorance, apple growers even bagged normal-sized apples and labeled them as snack-friendly. But my favorite example of the trend came courtesy of Shanley Farms, which introduced single-serving avocados packed in an egg carton. Continue reading

Kaminsky’s Fresh Out of KronutZ

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Kaminsky’s KronutZ

It took just over an hour, but Kaminsky’s version of cronuts achieved sell-out status.

Today marked the debut of the sugary doughnut-croissant hybrid, styled after the Dominique Ansel sensation. The downtown bakery is making a batch of 25 KronutZ on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, and pastries can’t be reserved: They’re sold on a first-come, first-served basis starting at noon, and customers are restricted to two KronutZ per person.

The last KronutZ crossed the counter at 1:15 p.m., spokesperson Kaili Howard says.

Kaminsky’s KronutZ cost $3.

Copycat Cronuts Come to Kaminsky’s Baking Co.

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cumi&ciki

Dominique Ansel has already moved on to the “magic souffle,” a sturdy, Grand Marnier-filled brioche which sold out within 15 minutes of its debut last Friday, but Charleston’s now catching up with the treat that made the New York City pastry chef a national sensation.

Kaminsky’s Baking Company this week is issuing the city’s first “KronutZ”, a play on the croissant-doughnut cross that briefly¬†sold for upwards of $20 on the NYC black market. To protect his cronut supply, Ansel imposed a two-cronut-a-person limit on rabid fans who started lining up outside his bakery two hours before opening.

Kaminsky’s is borrowing that tactic, meting out its daily supply of 25 KronutZ on a first-come, first-serve basis, limiting customers to a two KronutZ maximum. KronutZ will only be available on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, starting at noon (Ansel’s SoHo unleashes its cronuts at 8 a.m., so late-risers should appreciate the schedule.) Continue reading