High Wire and Edmund’s Oast on Imbibe’s Annual “Best Of” List

JF14_Cover310x400Charlestonians should have an easy time keeping an eye on at least two of the entities named to Imbibe Magazine’s second annual list of people, places and flavors to watch in 2014: The owners of High Wire Distilling Co. and Edmund’s Oast are among the 75 selections.

The beverage magazine this month released its best-of round-up, showcasing “who looks to have an interesting vision moving into the year ahead.” Beyond Charleston, Imbibe singled out Portland’s Mark Hellweg in the coffee category; Greg Engert of Washington D.C. in the beer division and Houston’s Alba Huerta and Bobby Huegel for their bartending prowess. Continue reading

The Alley and The Glass Onion Introduce New Cocktail Lists

whiterussianTwo local restaurants are this month rolling out new cocktail menus – and the featured drinks couldn’t be more conceptually different.

At The Glass Onion, which emphasizes, local seasonal cooking, the beverage program is treated as “a natural extension of culinary practices,” according to a press release.

For the drinker, that means bourbon punch made with whole milk from Edgefield; bloody Marys featuring High Wire vodka and garnished with housemade pickles and Cuba Libres built from High Wire Distilling rum and Mexican Coke (which will continue to be sweetened with sugar, despite the furor which this week erupted when online reports revealed an independent bottler was considering adding more fructose to the formula.) The West Ashley restaurant is also localizing its beer list with seasonal brews from Westbrook. Continue reading

Patrick Emerson Wine Bar Pops Up at High Wire Distilling Co.

A pop-up may sounds like a casual affair, but advanced sommelier Patrick Emerson is taking his upcoming temporary residency at High Wire Distilling Co. so seriously that he’s created a video to promote it.

As Emerson says in the ad, the Nov. 14 event will feature Sicilian wines, including a few varietals which Emerson surmises many potential tasters have never heard of. He’s quite possibly right, since I can’t make sense of the two grapes he mentions before Nero d’Avola: I’d like to blame his British accent, but suspect my knowledge of southern Italian varietals is failing me. (Here’s a comprehensive list of the region’s varietals if you need any help playing along.)

Butcher & Bee is selling take-out snacks for the pop-up, or guests can purchase wine by the bottle and tote it with them to the nearby restaurant. The party runs from 6 p.m. until “late.”