Husk’s Fried Chicken Featured on The Chew

friedchickenWhen it first debuted, Husk’s fried chicken was sold only by reservation. Then it was made available to a few lucky eaters who were first to follow social media clues to the restaurant’s bar. Now a nation of eaters is going to get a crack at the celebrated dish – or at least a good view of it.

Chef Sean Brock is preparing the fried chicken on today’s episode of The Chew. The segment was shot at Husk.

Back when it was fried in fried in butter, chicken fat, bacon fat and country ham fat, the chicken was named one of the best fried chickens in the U.S. by Food & Wine. The recipe has since evolved; Brock describes the current version as a mix of  styles including “gas station, honky tonk, Colonel Sanders, Husk five fat, hot chicken, and buffalo wings.”

The Chew airs on ABC at 1 p.m. After its initial broadcast, it will be archived here for online viewing.

What’s Gary Shtenygart Eating in Charleston?

www.randomhouse.comGary Shteyngart is not a food writer. He’s a novelist, and – with Tuesday’s release of Little Failure – a memoirist. But even if there aren’t baguettes and vodka bottles in every scene he stages, food is central to his work: As he told the New York Times in 2011, “I wander (New York City’s) streets — my mind attuned to the idea, ‘Must feed … must feed … must feed’ — but the wandering is really an excuse to look at the city and to reacquaint myself, consider how things are changing.”

During the outing recounted for the Times, Shteyngart polished off a Northern Chinese lamb burger; liang pi cold skin noodles; porchetta; trippa alla Romana and a vodka tonic.

The author is always eating: Judging from the press coverage of each of his books, his promotional schedule consists mainly of meeting reporters for Korean feasts and vodka sessions. Continue reading

Missed Husk’s Fried Chicken on Friday? Too Bad.

huskadAs first reported by Eater Charleston, Husk last Friday night fried up a test batch of chicken. Unfortunately for fans of the dish who weren’t tuned into the right Twitter feed, there’s no telling when the chicken will appear again.

“The fried chicken may make some surprise appearances on the Bar at Husk menu, but it will not be a scripted or weekly occurrence as it is in Nashville,” says Husk’s general manager Dan Latimer. “In Charleston, if we have it again, the production will be limited, not on a specific day, and will most likely be in the same vein as Friday, where we hit social media and see what happens.”

At Husk Nashville, fried chicken is the centerpiece of Tuesday’s $12 plate lunch. The restaurant this month debuted a rotating menu of meat-and-twos, available on weekdays between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. In addition to chicken, Husk Nashville is serving roast beef, meatloaf, catfish and pork chops. Continue reading

StarChefs.com Assembles Carolina Culinary Talent for Awards Gala

Chicken Liver Pâté, Pickles, and Pistachio PestoStarChefs.com, an online magazine which stages regional parties to recognize “up-and-coming chefs and culinary professionals,” found nearly all of the talent for its Carolina Rising Stars gala in Asheville and Charleston: The cities are home to eight of the 11 chefs participating in a Dec. 11 tasting at Memminger Auditorium.

“In Charleston, we found a tight-knit community of chefs that sees itself as the keeper of what is one of the richest food traditions in America,” editor-in-chief Antoinette Bruno is quoted as saying in a release from the organization, which considered 100 chefs in 18 cities and towns for the honor. Bruno added that Asheville chefs have distinguished themselves by being “weird,” in keeping with the town’s unofficial slogan.

Charleston’s chef honorees are Husk’s Travis Grimes; Two Boroughs Larder’s Josh Keeler; FIG’s Jason Stanhope and Butcher & Bee’s Stuart Tracy. Charlestonians also made the cut in a number of additional categories: David Schnell of Brown’s Court Bakery was an ‘artisan’ winner; Aaron Siegel of Fiery Ron’s Home Team BBQ took the ‘concept’ prize; Social Restaurant + Wine Bar’s Brad Ball shared the ‘sommelier’ title with Maximilian Kast of Fearrington House and The Gin Joint’s Joe Raya claimed one of two ‘mixologist’ awards.

Attendees who buy $85 tickets (or $115 tickets, if they want VIP status and the caviar reception which accompanies it) will undoubtedly eat well. But it’s the few chefs who hail from beyond the Carolina powerhouses who may well emerge as the evening’s breakout stars. Continue reading