Lee Bros. and Duvall Events Take James Beard Dish for Test Ride

smallleesThe James Beard Foundation journalism awards ceremony, at which Matt and Ted Lee are serving as emcees and first-course cooks, is a private affair. But a local sneak peek of the brothers’ awards dinner dish is free and open to the public.

On  Apr. 29, the Lees and dish collaborator Matt Greene of Duvall Events will host a tasting demo at the catering company’s North Charleston headquarters. The event includes wine, with liquor drinks available for purchase.

Details of the dish have not yet been disclosed, but the Lees are apparently pumped. Continue reading

The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen Finalist For IACP Cookbook Prize

leebookThe International Association of Culinary Professionals this morning via Eater released its list of food writing award finalists, and — by virtue of alphabetization — Matt and Ted Lee lead the list.

The Lee Brothers were nominated in the Cookbook-American category for The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen. They’re up against Daniel Humm and Will Guidara’s I Love New York: Ingredients and Recipes and Lucinda Scala Quinn’s Mad Hungry Cravings.

Although the Lee Brothers are the only Charlestonians among the nominees, finalists Anne Quatrano and Andy Ricker are headed here for the Wine + Food Festival.

IACP’s awards ceremony is scheduled for Mar. 15 in Chicago.

Lee Brothers Schedule Another Round of Cookbook Boot Camps

Today’s print food section features a story about contemporary cookbook publishing, and Matt and Ted Lee’s efforts to make the process more intelligible to prospective authors. Although the final Charleston 2014 session of the Boot Camp is already booked, the brothers this week announced a pair of new workshops in New York City.

The session on June 16-17 is targeted toward working chefs; representatives of other professions are welcome at the June 19-20 sessions. For more information, visit thefoodlife.com.

And, speaking of the print food section, we’re debuting a passel of new columns today. Don’t miss it.

Charleston Chefs Bring Bologna and Peanuts to Feast Portland

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Jay Friedman

Feast Portland, which serves as a coastal and calendrical bookend to the Charleston Food + Wine Festival, wrapped up this past Sunday, but not before impressing its lowcountry contributors.

“The scale, the walkability and the pacing were great,” reflects cookbook author Matt Lee, who along with brother Ted demonstrated oyster and peanut stew on the festival’s main stage and guest cheffed a Sunday brunch at Higgins Restaurant and Bar. “A ton of terrific things to try and do, but not so many you felt torn in eight directions.”

Like the Charleston Food + Wine Festival, Feast Portland draws the nation’s top kitchen talents to a town with a culinary reputation disproportionate to its size. But Feast is a much newer affair, having debuted just last year. Still, a few sessions have already emerged as classics, including the Night Market (deemed “brilliant” by Matt Lee, the event features chefs such as Aaron Franklin, Hugh Acheson, Chris Cosentino and Andy Ricker riffing on street food for a global bazaar format) and the Sandwich Invitational.

“South Carolina chef Sean Brock raised the ante with fried bologna,” The Oregonian reported in its coverage of the competition. Yet Brock’s sandwich, pictured above, ultimately lost out to a pair of homegrown entries: Portland’s Laurelhurst Market wowed the judges with its smoked beef tongue and pardon peppers on a roll, and Country Cat won the audience prize for its lamb cheeseburger. Continue reading

Brock’s Not the Only Local With Starring Role in PBS Series

mocA 15-year old Johns Island seafood retailer stands to become a Martha Lou’s Kitchen- level food world sensation after The Mind of a Chef’s second season debuts this month.

The PBS show, which endeavors to probe the methods and motivations of the nation’s most progressive chefs, last year won a James Beard Foundation award for its season’s worth of episodes devoted to David Chang. For the second season, April Bloomfield is splitting hosting duties with Sean Brock: The show’s first eight episodes feature Brock’s travels in Louisiana, Virginia, Tennessee and Senegal.

But the show’s opener – premiering nationally on Saturday, but scheduled to first air locally at 10 p.m. on Oct. 17 — is set mostly in Charleston. To demonstrate that Southern food “is not just a plate of fried chicken,” Brock invites a series of pals into Husk’s kitchen. He makes a peanut and field pea salad with Steven Satterfield, who regularly demonstrates his vegetable mastery at Atlanta’s Miller Union, and prepares Delta-style tamales with Mississippi’s John Currence.

“We’re at Husk,” points out Currence, who Brock identifies as one of his best friends. “How the hell do you not make tamales?” Continue reading