More Chillie Bear Memories

chillieMy recent story about Chillie Bears, Charleston’s classic frozen summertime treat, prompted readers of The Post and Courier to reminisce about buying (and selling) the icy cups. Since there’s not much in the way of a written record when it comes to Chillie Bears, their memories significantly enhance what’s known about the early history of the snack – including its demographic and geographic reach:

Growing up on Rutledge Avenue in the 1940s, we bought Chilly Bears, two for a nickel, at the Coastal Ice Cream Parlor on Rutledge near Spring Street. The small cup was decorated with polar bears and we warmed it between our hands, flipped it, and enjoyed. –  Sandra Lee Kahn Rosenblum Continue reading

Tsukemen-Slurping Time at XBB

tsukemenCelebrity chefs’ reverence for ramen – the subject of the first-ever issue of Lucky Peach, David Chang’s uber-hip food quarterly, and a recurring theme on Anthony Bourdain’s shows – has helped a nation of eaters understand there’s much more to the genre than the noodle packages they bought for a dime apiece as college students. But now that ramen’s common, it’s tsukemen’s turn.

Like ramen, tsukemen is composed of noodles, pork, egg and vegetal accoutrements. But if ramen is a symphony, tsukemen is a concerto, with each component taking a solo turn. Instead of mixing the elements together in a bowl of hot broth, a tsukemen chef serves the noodles, naked and cool, alongside a concentrated dipping broth. Tsukemen – pronounced SKEH-men, almost like lemon – is ideal for warm days. Continue reading

Tides Folly Beach Marks End of Summer With AYCE Luau

luau

Tides Folly Beach wants to save mainlanders the hassle of a tropical island trip.

Tides Folly Beach is stocking the buffet with a number of popular Hawaiian meat dishes for its second annual end-of-summer luau.

Although the hotel didn’t spring for Spam, a $65 ticket to the Sept. 13 evening bash includes access to an open bar and an all-you-can-eat mess of huli huli chicken, loco moco mahi mahi – lapped by mango salsa instead of the traditional brown gravy – roasted pork and laulau, or steamed shrimp. Chief Kamu and his hula dancers will provide the entertainment.

The event also includes music from the Kristi Starr Duo; door prizes and a movie on the beach. Pre-purchased tickets are recommended, but not required: To buy, call 588-6464.