Dickey’s Barbecue Pit Rides Into North Charleston

Family_PackDickey’s Barbecue Pit opens Thursday in North Charleston, offering an array of promotions. But will the restaurant serve up true Texas barbecue?

Depends who you ask. Franchise owner Vedit Patel, who discovered Dickey’s as a University of Arizona student, has said he’s “excited about opening a Texas barbecue restaurant.” And the chain has so many fans in the Lone Star state that its exclusion from Texas Monthly’s list of top 50 BBQ joints provoked a spate of angry e-mails from outraged Dickey’s fans.

“We assume this is satire,” barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn wrote in his official response to the complaint. Introducing an earlier iteration of the list, the magazine’s food editor, Patricia Sharpe, dismissed Dickey’s output as “mediocre.” Continue reading

Shrimp and Grits Takes Trip Through a Texas Deep Fryer

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steevithak

When the State Fair of Texas starts this Sunday, the long list of deep-fried concessions will include a lowcountry dish making its Dallas debut.

Allan Weiss of Weiss Enterprises worked with a consulting company to develop deep-fried shrimp and grits, which the fair’s publicity department describes as “homemade grits…made with a blend of fresh herbs, cheese, and Cajun shrimp, coated in a secret batter and deep fried.”

“As far as shrimp and grits go, I like the way it tastes and so forth,” says Weiss, who could only spare a minute of phone time in the week leading up to the fair, the largest annual exposition in North America. Continue reading

Home Team Takes on Texas

htbrisketHome Team BBQ this weekend unveiled the fruits of owner Aaron Siegel and executive chef Taylor Garrigan’s recent study trip to Austin, Tex: Brisket, beautifully fatty, smoky and tender — if a cut below what the pair likely encountered in Hill Country.

The brisket I sampled at The Alley on Saturday night was the unfortunate victim of inexpert slicing, a problem all-too-common even in the Lone Star state, as my friend Daniel Vaughn’s recent Texas Monthly blog post attests.  As Vaughn, the magazine’s barbecue editor, points out, there are several ways to slice a brisket, but none of them involve slicing with the grain. A brisket sliced with the grain acquires an unappealing, stringy pull, and is tougher than brisket sliced against the grain.

“That’s one of the things we’re dealing with,” Siegel says of the extensive staff training required to produce a perfect brisket plate. “We’re schooling everyone on how to serve it.” Continue reading