Unsolicited Advice for Seeking Local Restaurant Advice

foilman

foilman

Lest the following sound petulant, I want to emphasize at the outset how much I enjoy responding to reader requests for restaurant recommendations. As my grandmother might say, I don’t eat eight burgers a week for my health. The fun of exploring the local food scene is sharing what I find: I love trading tips with residents and helping visitors plot their Charleston dining adventures.

But it’s astounding how many e-mails don’t provide any details about what the writer’s seeking. “You probably get questions like this a lot, but it looks like there are many great restaurants in Charleston,” a correspondent wrote this morning. “Can you recommend any that would be within walking distance of the Embassy Suites near Marion Square?”

According to a downtown Charleston restaurant map I picked up at Tales of the Cocktail this summer, that narrows the choices down to about 107 eating places. I consider many of them pretty great, but I have no idea whether the writer and I have the same definition of greatness. He sounded like an awfully nice guy, so I’d hate to steer him wrong.

By contrast, another future visitor last week sent me his tentative dining agenda, along with the following guidelines for additional ideas: Continue reading

Summerville to Officially Launch Sweet Tea Trail

nate steiner

nate steiner

The Sweet Tea Trail, a promotional concept which grew from an 1890 receipt and a desire to drum up Summerville’s tourism economy, will officially open next month.

On Oct. 8, the Greater Summerville/Dorchester County Chamber of Commerce from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. will celebrate the trail’s launch at Hutchinson Square with a free event featuring tea-themed storytelling, tea tasting, tea trail ribbon-cutting and cornhole.

The chamber’s leadership class dreamed up the trail, which winds from Azalea Hall to the Plantation District, as a clever way of capitalizing on a nineteenth-century bill of sale showing Civil War veterans purchased 600 pounds of sugar and 880 gallons of tea for a reunion. Assuming the sugar wasn’t meant for the beans listed on the receipt, Summerville declared itself the birthplace of the iconic Southern beverage. Continue reading