Old St. Andrew’s Announces Tearoom Dates

churchThe tearoom at St. Andrews Parish Church will operate from Mar. 24-Apr 5 this year.

Described as Charleston’s oldest tea room, the original pop-up lunchroom will serve she-crab soup, okra soup, chicken salad and shrimp paste sandwiches from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., every day but Sunday. Packaged food items will be available through the gift shop.

The church’s female members 61 years ago developed the tearoom to feed hungry tourists in the midst of plantation visits. Proceeds from the tea room and gift shop benefit programs sponsored by The Church Women of Old St. Andrew’s.

The tearoom doesn’t accept credit cards, but it takes reservations for parties of six or more eaters: Call 766-1541 or e-mail office@oldstandrews.org.

Following the Chicken Feet Story Further

chxfeetMy blog post about chicken feet, which last Wednesday migrated to print, gave a number of readers occasion to reflect on the Gullah-Geechee tradition of enjoying the same portion of the bird.

The trick to eating feet, according to a Gullah-speaking caller who left a message on Life Editor Teresa Taylor’s voicemail, is avoiding the toenails.

Maverick Southern Kitchens chef Frank Lee concurred in an e-mail, describing the local dish as tender-cooked chicken feet surrounded by potatoes. “Just chew ‘em up and spit out the toenails,” he writes (he also sent along this photo of stock-making at SNOB.) Continue reading

Looking For Deli? Make It Yourself.

The-Artisan-Jewish-Deli-at-HomeA new generation of restaurateurs has reinvented nearly everything about the traditional Jewish deli: At places such as San Francisco’s Wise Sons and Brooklyn’s Mile End, the sandwiches are reasonably sized; the knishes and babka are handmade; the coffee is of high quality and the counter clerk’s more likely to pontificate about the origins of kugel than snap at a customer for speaking too softly.

What hasn’t changed, though, is the deli’s staunchly urban identity. Unlike other imported cuisines, which have popped up far from the immigrant communities associated with them, deli hasn’t strayed much beyond the very biggest cities.

Nick Zukin, founder of Portland’s revered Kenny & Zuke’s and co-author of the newly-published The Artisan Jewish Deli at Home, says he doesn’t foresee thoughtful deli sweeping the nation anytime soon. Continue reading